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22.05.2020 | 4 minutes

Electric Vehicle Fleet: 11 Dos and Don’ts for Fleet Managers


Vattenfall started transitioning its vehicle fleet to alternatives using electric powertrains in 2017. It is no small task when you consider there are over 4,500 vehicles across Europe in the fleet.

Vattenfall is building up a large electric vehicle charging infrastructure in northern Europe, and the Corporation is setting a good example: through the electrification of its own fleet. It has gained valuable expertise with company cars as a pioneer for this project and it can now leverage this knowledge when providing advice to customers on their fleet electrification strategy.

Here are 11 tips on what to do for a smooth transition to a fleet of company cars using electric vehicles and what potential roadblocks to look out for:

  • Look at your budget and start by either transitioning a few vehicles to hybrid or electric alternatives rather than changing your whole fleet of company cars to electric vehicles at once. As an alternative you can consider leasing electric vehicles as a starting point and evaluate your options while you test operations in everyday use.
  • As the fleet manager, you should involve drivers and other important stakeholders. Organize test drives for your employees and get their opinions on the various models. After all, they are the ones who will be driving them. This will foster enthusiasm among the drivers and soften the transition.
  • Will the employee be charging the electric vehicle at home or while at work? How far will each vehicle be driven every day? These questions will help you find the company vehicle that is best suited to your case.
  • How many charging points do you need at your location? Start small by ordering one or two charging points, and then check usage and user patterns in order to make an informed decision before adding more charging points.
  • Get your charging station supplier to look at how much energy you have available and whether you need your charging points to have load balancing.
  • Do your employees need a charging point at home? Help them set up a charging station so they can charge their company vehicle at home.
  • Make it possible for them to use public charging stations. After all, the infrastructure is constantly improving here. The My InCharge online portal, for example, enables fleet managers to access important information (where the charges take place, when, for how long, and the cost). It will make process billing and settlement easier to perform.
  • Both the performance of electric cars and their range are increasing. However, they do not yet come close to vehicles with combustion engines. In most cases, this is not a problem when going about one’s daily business, especially if your employees keep their trips short.
  • Electric cars are best in summer. Bear in mind that the vehicles need a little more electricity in winter for the same distance.
  • Be creative: Also consider solutions like car sharing and carpooling.
  • Look at tax benefits, subsidies, and corporate grants that may be available. The government provides financial incentives for electromobility in many places.

Businesses with fleet vehicles are important players in the transition to electric driving. If you plan to change to an electric fleet, you need to gain a better understanding of electric vehicles and then develop a strategy. The electrification of your fleet will go smoothly with Vattenfall as your qualified, experienced partner. Transitioning your fleet to electric vehicles will help you reduce your overall fleet costs (maintenance costs and fuel costs will be much lower). At the same time, you will show your customers, employees, and local community that you care about the environment and are tackling local air quality issues head on.

 


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